It's 2017 and I Just Picked Up Guitar Hero Live

It's 2017 and I Just Picked Up Guitar Hero Live

GameStop had it on clearance for $20 so I figured I'd try it out.

Guitar Hero Live released in 2015, a time when both Activision and Harmonix thought they could bring back their rhythm game super stars. As it turns out, they were both wrong. I don't think either Guitar Hero Live or Rock Band 4 performed horribly, but they did come and go without much notice. 

It's a shame, really. Even though I can't speak to Rock Band 4, I can say that Guitar Hero Live is pretty fun. It's not as good as the first time I played Guitar Hero 3, but it does remind me of those days quite a bit. 

Reinventing the controller was a big deal for Guitar Hero Live, and for as much skepticism as I had, I actually really enjoy the new layout. Having to re-learn how to play Guitar Hero is what really made this game for me. Otherwise, I would have just started out on expert mode and crushed every song, because, you know, I'm really good at Guitar (Hero).

However, I don't know that a game like Guitar Hero Live could have ever lived up to its predecessors. The live video crowd is extraordinarily lame, the microtransactions in Guitar Hero Live make me want to punch a wall, and the on-disc music consists almost exclusively of pop music from the years 2010-2015. That's right, pretty much no rock music. Pretty much no guitar music, in fact.

Guitar Hero TV, the game's online mode, does rectify that, due to its ever-growing 500 song library. This is where players can find all the good tracks they want to play. However, you can't buy them. It works like a phone game, and I won't bother getting into that. It's fun, but I just want to buy the songs I want to play. 

I think I'm mostly enjoying the game because the new control scheme. It blows my mind that sometimes I look at the note highway and my fingers can't comprehend what they're supposed to do. 

Perhaps the most laughable part is that I'm playing the game on Wii U. Fitting, right?

If you're interested, you can get the game dirt cheap almost anywhere. I think it's absolutely worth $20-$30 if you can find it, especially if you're nostalgic for the early 2000s rhythm game music scene. Rest in peace $120 frayed jeans, and Taking Back Sunday. 

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